HISTORICAL

The prediction of electromagnetic waves by Maxwell and the demonstration of their existence by Hertz led several scientists to speculate that astronomical objects might generate radio waves. Many scientists, such as Thomas Edison, Max Planck, and Guglielmo Marconi set the groundwork for the later discovery of radio astronomy by Karl Jansky. In 1933, Jansky, working at Bell Telephone Laboratories, discovered that radio radiation was coming from the Milky Way and was strongest in the direction of the center of our Milky Way galaxy, in the constellation of Sagittarius. Two men who learned of Jansky's discovery were of great influence on the later development of the new study of radio astronomy: one was Grote Reber, who singlehandedly built a radio telescope in his back yard in 1937 and did the first systematic survey of radio waves from the sky. The second was John Kraus, who, after World War II, started a radio observatory at Ohio State University and wrote a textbook on radio astronomy, which is still the "bible" for radio astronomers. For more information, you can read about the Ham Radio Connection, links to Historical telescopes at Green Bank, West Virginia, or the Early History of Radio Astronomy.

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Pioneers (6 images)
Reber
Reber
Ewen & Purcell
Ewen & Purcell
Jansky
Jansky
Reber
Reber
Reber
Reber
Jansky
Jansky

Telescopes (10 images)
300ft
300ft
85ft
85ft
Jansky Antenna
Jansky Antenna
Reber Telescope
Reber Telescope
300ft
300ft
GBI
GBI

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